Communication, Leadership, and Writing Your Own User Manual

Unfortunately, newborn children and team members don’t come with a set of instructions.  But here’s your chance to write your own “user’s manual.”  Creating your own set of instructions for yourself can be a great way to build stronger relationships in your organization.  It’s a technique we use at Performance Strategies Groupin which two or more people jot complete a series of sentences to identify ways to better coach and be coached, allowing team members to create a common baseline for behavioral and cultural dialogue.

This tool may be particularly useful to do so when new team members join an organization, enabling the parties participating in the exercise to accelerate an understanding about what is important to each of them.   Often, we employ this exercise to compliment our use of several behavioral profiles we use in leadership and teambuilding exercises and become the foundation for creating a coaching culture.  With that understanding, please complete the following sentences with the realization there may be one or more ideas that come to mind.  Try to identify the two or three things that are most important to you, rather than list all your possible responses.

  1. If you want to motivate or energize me, you should…
  2. If you want to frustrate or demotivate me, you should…
  3. I give you permission to….
  4. If I have done something well please…
  5. If my productivity, accuracy, or some other performance measure by which I am gaged falls short, you should…
  6. I would prefer…
  7. I like a work environment in which….
  8. It is difficult for me to…
  9. It is really important for me to…
  10. Conflict is…
  11. As I understand them my primary responsibilities by which my performance will be measured includes…
  12. I need help when…
  13. I get upset when…
  14. I am the kind of employee/manager who values…
  15. I think our organizational culture values…
  16. When I am under stress I tend to…
  17. I feel devalued when…
  18. I feel valued when…
  19. When our organization is undergoing change in policies, people, or processes, I would appreciate
  20. I am not sure who is responsible for…
  21. I am at my best when…

Keep in mind this is only a brief list of statements, not a comprehensive one.  When discussing your responses with someone else in your organization, you will likely find yourself adding to the list.  You should feel free to do so and revisit this dialogue regularly.

If you’d like more information about how Performance Strategies Group can help you and your organization improve your communication, sales and leadership skills, or with our strategic planning process, contact principal consultant, Jim Owens at jim@psghsv.com

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Performance Matters: Must be present to win & sales plateaus

Leadership & TeamworkAn Evangelical Mission

I’ve been on an evangelical mission lately, preaching the gospel of self-care for leaders and sales people.  And my message has been pretty simple.  Take care of yourself so you can take care of other people.  So what the heck does that have to do with teamwork and leadership?  If you’ve ever bought a raffle ticket stamped with “must be present to win,” you will have some idea of what I mean.

Leaders have the responsibility to care for their teams.  And they’re confronted with a seemingly endless list of needs, expectations, and questions from their teams.  And they get fatigued.  And fatigue, as Patton (I think) said, “makes cowards of us all.” Stress, fatigue, anxiety, and impatience may be symptoms you aren’t taking care of yourself.  Leadership requires your presence.  It requires your engagement.  You have to “be present” to lead. So if you want to become a better leader, make sure you are taking care of yourself.  You’ll make better decisions, be a better-problem solver, be more patient, and probably, a lot more fun to be around if you do.

 SalesBreaking Through Performance Plateaus:

If you’ve ever hit a plateau in some athletic pursuit—a race time, maximum bench press weight, or such—you know you have to change something to break through it.  Sometimes identifying “why” you can’t break through it can be the biggest challenge you face in raising your performance to the next level.  So what do you do?

Chances are you’ve settled into a routine because you’re successful enough.  You’re doing the same things over and over again and getting the same results. During December, take a couple of hours to examine your sale process from top to bottom.  Examine how you find prospects and who they are.  Take a look at how you prepare for sales call, develop proposals and deliver them. Look at the deals you lost carefully. Then ask yourself these three questions:

 

  • Am I calling on the right people or wasting precious time on people who will never become my client?
  • Am I calling on enough of the right people to break through my performance plateau?
  • Am I doing the right things in front of my prospects and clients?

 

Over the next few weeks we’ll take a look at some strategies you can use to help you break through the plateaus all of face at one point another in a sales career.

 

 

If you’ve found this information useful, encouraging or might see a way we can improve it, please let us know.  And if you thought it was encouraging, forward it to a friend so they can subscribe. If you want to find out more about how Performance Strategies Group helps organizations sharpen their sales skills and processes, builds more self-aware and resilient leaders, or equip more productive teams, find us online at www.performancestrategiesgrouponline.com, or call Principal Consultant, Jim Owens @ 256-426-0305.

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